© 2019 por Ik Projects.

 Av. Mariscal La Mar 1265, Miraflores.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook

STATEMENT

The aesthetics and vocabulary that Alonzo uses reveal the confrontations between the natural and the industrial, which he transcribes in sculptures of extreme material qualities.

 

Alonzo affirms the mobility throughout his practice, "looting the exterior" with materials and forms from volcanoes to skyscrapers and urban ruins.

 

His approach to sculpture breaks the stereotypes of masculine sculptural practice where the massive rhymes with perpetuity and immobility.

 

Like the autonomous bodies, once erected in space, their sculptures combat their environment. The artist proposes a complex laboratory, composed of transmutative practices and hybrid gestures.

 

Emancipating the materials of their conventions, the mosaics are detached from the walls, the marble stops shining, the rods are exposed and the concrete becomes fragile.

 

The constructions of Alonzo force the contention between the senses, through formal compositions of precarious mounds. At the same time, minimal, repeated and direct gestures build dense bodies. Somewhere, between author pieces and vandalism, the sharp addition of images creates a dual intimacy between the artist and raw materials.

BIOGRAPHY

Gwladys Alonzo (1990, France) grew up in a family of Polish and Sicilian immigrants in various rural and industrial areas of France. The wide-ranging geography and environments she experienced growing up fed her sensitivity to codes and identities of different cultures. From Latin America to Europe, the landscape she investigates continues to grow, a rural culture confronting an expanding universe on an international scale.

 

Gwladys Alonzo’s aesthetic and lexical vocabulary reveals confrontations between the natural and the industrial, which transcribe their extreme material qualities on her sculptures. She asserts mobility throughout her practice, "poaching the outside" with materials and forms from volcanoes to traffic jams, skyscrapers, and urban ruins. Alonzo’s approach to sculpture breaks the stereotypes of the masculine practice of sculpture where massiveness rhymes with perpetuity and immobility.

 

Like autonomous bodies, once erected in space her sculptures combat their surroundings. The artist proposes a complex kitchen composed of transmutative practices and hybrid gestures. She emancipates the materials from their conventions. The tiles come off the wall, the marble does not shine anymore, the rebar are exposed, the concrete becomes fragile. Alonzo’s constructions force contention amongst the senses, through precarious formal mounds. At the same time, minimal and direct, repeated gestures build dense bodies. Somewhere between signature and vandalism, the pointed addition of images creates an intimate duality between the artist and the raw generic material.